Gardening

My Wild Child

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I have this little herb that I planted in my front garden. Actually, I moved it from my former home to this one. It is a herb that is hard to find here in the U.S.. It is called Mexican Oregano, Lippia graveolens.  But I call it Muchacho, my Wild Child. Why you ask? This:

Wild-child

It reminds me of a little boy with a bad haircut!

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Hurricane Irma Survivors

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We had little structural damage from hurricane Irma, but some of our garden took a real beating as I posted here. In addition to the wind damage, our entire area was sadly afflicted by the salt water carried in the winds. Many of the trees and shrubs in our area look as though they are burned on their windward side.

Our little garden spot seems to have recovered well. My Meyer lemon was nearly stripped of leaves, so I pruned it back, removed a lot of the lemons, and gave it a couple of gallons of fish and seaweed fertilizer. It is making a spectacular comeback.

meyer

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A Saturday Surprise

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I usually check on my gardens every morning. I am always on the lookout for marauding bugs, or plant issues. This time I was greeted by this:

berry-blossom

One of my strawberry plants has a blossom. Quite unexpected, since they are relatively new. I bought two 3″ pots on sale after Hurricane Irma. I brought them home and split each pot into two plants. Hopefully, the resulting four plants are the beginning of a border for one of my raised bed planters.

These are Quinault strawberries, the only plant available locally. From the plant propaganda it will be a hardy perennial that is everbearing, meaning that it may produce fruit from Spring through Fall. This year, I am not planning on harvesting any berries, I am much more interested in the plants producing new baby plants from their runners.

Have you grown Quinault strawberries?

Until next time

Toni

Where Did I Go?

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Again we have be doing some extensive traveling! It would take me the rest of the weekend to write about all of the places Mr. M and I have been to since last fall.  In October, we did a Mediterranean cruise which I won’t write about since I have done that before here, here,  here, and here.

Our latest travels were quite different . We started out in Florida, where we live, and basically went around the world. We spent about 10 weeks traveling through Southeast Asia,  the Suez canal area, Scotland, and Canada, to finally arrive back home in time for a week Caribbean cruise with 14 other members of our family.

I am planning to write about some of the areas we visited and to post some our travel photos. In the meantime, I am very busy sewing and gardening. I had to leave our little raised garden beds fallow while we were gone but as soon as we returned I planted them.

Before planting, this year I put drip irrigation, in the form of an “ooze tube”. It seems to be a good addition. I have found that keeping raised beds irrigated in the Florida heat too much for hand watering! Now I just  attach the hose to the tube, turn the water on just a tad, set a timer and, basically, forget about it for a set period of time, usually about 90 minutes to two hours. So much better!

Although I had to plant the gardens in late June, I chose heat loving plants and they seem to be pretty happy right now. I know they may look a little crowded, but I do that purposely, to help shade the soil. Also, I am hoping to “outfox” the wildlife here that regularly check out our homegrown produce. We actually lost a pineapple to some marauding raccoons!

Here is a photo of the ooze tube, most of it is buried about 2″ deep:

irrigation

 

The tomatillo garden:

 

tomatillos

The green bean and zucchini garden: Note that the yellow arrow here indicates where some purported bush beans seem to have become pole beans! I was unprepared for this, hence the jury-rigged trellis!

beans

And just for fun, our first bunch of bananas this year. They are Blue Java, also known as Custard Ice Cream bananas: (guess what they taste like!)

20170720_175441

If you are curious about the brown spots on the two bananas on the right, it is from the latex-like sap of the banana tree. It stains everything it touches, especially clothing! Ask me how I know!

Until next time!

Toni